Monday, November 24, 2014

Don't Just Fish, Fish like a Neanderthal.



Over 5,000 years ago, a pair of fishermen waded into the cold waters of the Baltic sea near Denmark. Little did they know that their actions were being recorded by the sands below their feet. Archaeologists discovered foot prints and some Stone Age fishing gear in a dried up inlet on the island of Lolland in Denmark. Two different sets of foot prints and a fishing fence, a tool used to catch fish which dates back around 3,000 BC years, were found. It appeared that the foot prints were made at different times.

Stone age fishermen used elaborate fish traps, similar to movable fences to catch their prey. The wooden fence was made in sections and lined up as the tide came in to trap the fish. The fence was moved at times to better fishing areas and this is likely when the foot prints were made in the sand and preserved by the clay like floor.

Also near the fence, was this well preserved image in the sandy clay bottom. It indicates the exact time a fish was ready to take the bait of a fisherman, 5,000 years ago. Amazing!!!
Interestingly, one can determine a lot from this image. First, fish have not changed much in 5,000 years, second, fisherman have not evolved much either. So, when you grasp that juicy, red wiggler and secure it to that super sharp hook, you are "Stone Age fishing! Yep, but better yet "Don't Just Fish, Fish like a Neanderthal."    
 
I've been painting lake, river and bay maps for over four years. My maps make great gifts for the lake house owner, lake lover, or fisherman. I have over two hundred on my website that can be purchased right from the site, or I can do custom and personalizes lake, river or bay maps, too. Oh yeah, I hide a tiny mermaid in the waters of all my maps that folks love to search for. Find out more interesting facts about my treasured maps by going to LeoMaps.com
Remember: Life is short, get away from the big screen and get on a big stream!

1 comment:

  1. Good thing I have waders, it's getting a little deep.

    ReplyDelete